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June 3, 2014

Your Kid Is Weird - Life on the Autism Spectrum

Guest Post: This is a very special guest post written by my daughter, Lee Anne.


A homeschool mom explains why she's proud to admit she and her daughter have Asperger's Syndrome.

Your kid is weird. Yes, you read that correctly. Your child is strange. No doubt about it. So is mine. So is every child on the autism spectrum.  

We have kind-hearted, genuine, loving, sensitive, compassionate, passionate, intelligent, INCREDIBLE people that we're raising. That, my friends, is something we all should be very proud of.

Unfortunately, not many people are proud to admit who their child is. Many people want to try to hide it from the world. They don't want to "label" their child in eyes of others. They don't want other children, parents, teachers, or random strangers looking at their child as the "autistic kid". 

But why not? Why hide that? You and I both know that our kids will never get away from it. They will not suddenly wake up one day neurologically "normal". I know this, because I have yet to wake up neurologically normal. 

I have Asperger's and I am completely happy to let others know this. I also let others know my child has it.

Why, you wonder? Why shout out to the world how weird your child is?


Why I Tell People My Child Has Asperger's



People Walk Away from the 'Weird' Kid

One reason I tell others that my child has Asperger's is that I have watched my daughter around others for years. I've watched the way she tries to interact and play. I've seen how she would try to get into a conversation with someone and always say the most awkward or strange thing. Then I would have to watch that person walk away from her.

I remember doing this (being awkward) as a child. Every day. 

I didn't stop experiencing this until I was in my late teens and had absolutely no friends. I had to learn, in the most painful way, not to let people know who and how I am just so they would talk to me and befriend me. Eventually, when my weird quirks would come out, the 'friends' would stop wanting to be around me. 

In time, I learned that you have to lay your cards on the table. Otherwise, how will you know who is willing to deal with your weirdness?

I Want to Dispel the Misconceptions of Autism and Asperger's

Another reason I like to tell strangers that my daughter is on the autism spectrum is because I get to crush any misconceptions people have about us. Every time I have told someone my daughter has Asperger's, the response is: "Really? I never would have known!". 

That's right. You wouldn't have known. You would have just thought she was weird and never given her a chance to be the incredible person she is. 

I get to dispel all the myths and misconceptions that people have about those of us on the spectrum. I really hit them with a shocker when I say "Yeah, I'm an 'aspie', too!". 

Again - they never would have known.


Ignorance is NOT Bliss - It Is Silent Suffering

I grew up never being able to explain, to myself or anyone else, why I am the way I am. I couldn't understand...
  • why I have words or even entire thoughts repeat in my head - endlessly!
  • why I have an obsession with counting (counting anything - steps I'm taking, syllables as people are speaking or whatever else I can count). 
  • why I must learn everything about any topic in which I have an interest, causing me to have so much more knowledge on those topics than most of my peers.
  • why I have to do things a certain way - otherwise it cannot be done. 
  • why I can't look at people in the eye when I'm talking. 
  • why I picture absolutely everything I am saying and use my hands like a theatrical performance to explain to you what I am picturing. 
Learning I Had Asperger's Set Me Free to Be Me

Learning I had Asperger's gave me the ability to understand myself. It also gave me the ability explain me to everyone else. I suddenly had the chance to have the life that I needed and wanted. I could finally converse with people in a way that worked for me without the other person thinking I am weird. 

When I experienced how great that felt, I had to show my child how to do the same.

I Want My Child to Be Comfortable With Who She Is

I want her to develop a self-awareness and appreciation for who she is. 

How could I not? How could I deprive her of the chance for a happy existence? Why would we ever want to do that to our children?

Your kid is weird. You know it. I know it. And I guarantee that your child knows it even better than you do. 

Let them be happy about it. Let them share it. Announce it to the world. Shout it out when he enters a playground. Hold a sign. Wear a t-shirt. Let them tell others how weird and awesome they are! 

Allow him to say that he is awkward, but can find amusement in anything. They have a hard time with conversation, but you'll never know a more honest person in your lifetime. They are incredibly shy, but will be the greatest friend you've ever had. Allow them to show you who they are and how much better your life will be with them in it.

Your kid is weird - and perfect.



Lee Anne is a married, homeschooling mom to one beautiful 6-year-old little girl. She works part-time while also attending college part-time. 

She enjoys spending time with her family and hanging out with her siblings. Her hobbies and interests include crocheting, sewing, artistry, music and singing. 



(See 10 Things You Should Know about "Aspies.")

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Happy Homeschooling!


Lee Anne

3 comments:

  1. WOW!! What a wonderful post. ALL parents of special needs need to read this, not just parents of kids on the Autism spectrum. Great job on your first post Lee Anne your words are all so very true!!

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    1. Thank you! I absolutely agree with you on that, but I think it's really hard for most people to do. Most people have these special needs kids and can't connect with them or understand it, themselves. I've been fortunate enough to be an aspie, raising an aspie. I know how she thinks and feels. But everyone should be more accepting and enthusiastic about their kids needs :)

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    2. I agree. It wasn't so diffiult to raise you because you were like me. I understood how you thought and felt. With the bipolar kids, however, I find it difficult to understand issues because I'm not bipolar.. It's a big puzzle I'm constantly trying to put together. That's why most of the time I consult with one of my adult bipolar kids - "Hey.. she's doing this. Why?" In a way, having those older bipolar bears makes it easier to deal with the younger ones.

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